England and Wales coroners’ statistics published

The 2016 statistics relating to Coroners’ Courts in England and Wales have been published.

The 2016 statistics relating to Coroners’ Courts in England and Wales have been published.

There has been an increase of 2% from 2015 in reported deaths and 46% of all registered deaths were reported to coroners, an increase of 1% from 2015. There has also been an increase in deaths in state detention up 19% to 574 and an increase in the number of inquests overall, up 18% to 38,626.

In terms of conclusions, natural causes accounted for 39%, accident and misadventure accounted for 19%, suicide accounted for 9% and unclassified accounted for 12%.

Post-mortem examinations were conducted in 47% of inquest cases, which was a notable decrease of 9% from 2015. The lowest proportion of post-mortem examinations took place in North Lincolnshire and Grimsby (21%) whilst the highest proportion took place in the Isle of Wight (62%).

Deaths reported to coroners occurring outside of England and Wales remained stable at 1%.

The average time to process inquests continues to vary widely, from five weeks in Hartlepool to 40 weeks in the Isle of Wight.

The national average of proportion of deaths reported to the coroner was 46%, which ranged from 28% in East Lancashire to 96% in Stoke-on-Trent and North Staffordshire.

A full report can be accessed via the government website.

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